Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1004854
 
 

Citations (1)



 


 



International Economic Structures and American Foreign Policy, 1887-1934


David A. Lake


UC San Diego


World Politics, Vol. 35, No. 4, pp. 517-543, July 1983

Abstract:     
American foreign economic policy between 1887 and 1934 was shaped in important ways by the international economic structure and the position of the United States as a "supporter" within it. As Britain's hegemony declined, and particularly after it joined the United States as a supporter just prior to World War I, American foreign economic policy became more liberal and active. Once Britain was transformed from a supporter into a spoiler in the late 1920s, leaving the United States as the sole supporter within the IES, both the international economy and American policy became more unstable and protectionist. During the 1970s, the United States, West Germany, and France all emerged as supporters within the IES, indicating that a moderately stable and liberal international economy may continue to exist in the future.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 27

Keywords: international trade, hegemony, international cooperation, foreign economic policy

JEL Classification: F11, F14, F15, F43

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: August 6, 2007  

Suggested Citation

Lake, David A., International Economic Structures and American Foreign Policy, 1887-1934. World Politics, Vol. 35, No. 4, pp. 517-543, July 1983. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1004854

Contact Information

David A. Lake (Contact Author)
UC San Diego ( email )
9500 Gilman Drive
Code 0521
La Jolla, CA 92093-0521
United States
(858) 534-0347 (Phone)
(858) 534-7130 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://dss.ucsd.edu/~dlake/
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 836
Downloads: 94
Download Rank: 162,205
Citations:  1

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo4 in 0.328 seconds