Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1022998
 


 



The Mountain Meadows Massacre of 1857 and the Trials of John D. Lee: An Account


Douglas Linder


University of Missouri at Kansas City - School of Law

2007


Abstract:     
Called the darkest deed of the nineteenth century, the brutal 1857 murder of 120 men, women, and children at a place in southern Utah called Mountain Meadows remains one of the most controversial events in the history of the American West. Although only one man, John D. Lee, ever faced prosecution (for what probably stands as one of the four largest mass killings of civilians in United States history), many other Mormons ordered, planned, or participated in the massacre of wagon loads of Arkansas emigrants as they headed through southwestern Utah on their way to California. Special controversy surrounds the role in the 1857 events of one man, Brigham Young, the fiery prophet of the Church of Latter-day Saints who led his embattled people to the promised land in the valley of the Great Salt Lake. What exactly Brigham Young knew, and when he knew it, are questions that historians still debate.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 10

Keywords: Famous Trials, Trial, Mountain Meadow, Utah, John D. Lee, Mormons, Brigham Young, Latter-day Saints, LDS, Salt Lake

JEL Classification: K10, K40, K41, K42

working papers series





Download This Paper

Date posted: October 22, 2007  

Suggested Citation

Linder, Douglas, The Mountain Meadows Massacre of 1857 and the Trials of John D. Lee: An Account (2007). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1022998 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1022998

Contact Information

Douglas Linder (Contact Author)
University of Missouri at Kansas City - School of Law ( email )
5100 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110-2499
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 1,246
Downloads: 94
Download Rank: 166,411

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo7 in 0.250 seconds