Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1023762
 


 



The Thirteenth Amendment's Revolutionary Aims


Alexander Tsesis


Loyola University Chicago School of Law

October 31, 2009

PROMISES OF LIBERTY, Alexander Tsesis, ed., Columbia University Press, Forthcoming

Abstract:     
The origins of the Thirteenth Amendment are found as much in the period of American reconstruction, when states ratified it into the Constitution, as they are in the American Revolution. During both eras Americans emphasized the human value of liberty. This chapter explores the notions of liberty that informed congressional debates on the proposed Amendment. It first reflects on revolutionary notions of liberty and then demonstrates how abolitionists relied on them. The chapter next turns to how abolitionist principles animated House and Senate debates about the proposed Thirteenth Amendment. It concludes with an explanation of why the Amendment proved to be inadequate to achieve radical Reconstruction.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 34

Keywords: Thirteenth Amendment, civil rights, legal history, history, constitutional history, constitutional theory, revolutionary ideology, abolitionism

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Date posted: October 23, 2007 ; Last revised: November 2, 2009

Suggested Citation

Tsesis, Alexander, The Thirteenth Amendment's Revolutionary Aims (October 31, 2009). PROMISES OF LIBERTY, Alexander Tsesis, ed., Columbia University Press, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1023762

Contact Information

Alexander Tsesis (Contact Author)
Loyola University Chicago School of Law ( email )
25 E. Pearson
Chicago, IL 60611
United States
312-915-7929 (Phone)

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