Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1093463
 
 

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Public Confidence in Policing: A Neo-Durkheimian Perspective


Jonathan Jackson


London School of Economics & Political Science - Department of Methodology

Jason Sunshine


New York University (NYU)

March 1, 2007

British Journal of Criminology, Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 214-233, March 1, 2007

Abstract:     
Public confidence in policing has received much attention in recent years, but few studies outside of the United States have examined the sociological and social-psychological processes that underpin trust and support. This study, conducted in a rural English location, finds that trust and confidence in the police are shaped not by sentiments about risk and crime, but by evaluations of the values and morals that underpin community life. Furthermore, to garner public confidence, the police must be seen first to typify group morals and values and second to treat the public with dignity and fairness. All these findings are consistent with the perspective that people are Durkheimian in their attitudes towards crime, policing and punishment-a perspective developed here in this paper.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 22

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Date posted: February 29, 2008 ; Last revised: February 24, 2013

Suggested Citation

Jackson, Jonathan and Sunshine, Jason, Public Confidence in Policing: A Neo-Durkheimian Perspective (March 1, 2007). British Journal of Criminology, Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 214-233, March 1, 2007. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1093463 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azl031

Contact Information

Jonathan Jackson (Contact Author)
London School of Economics & Political Science - Department of Methodology ( email )
Houghton Street
London, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom
+0044-207-955-7652 (Phone)
Jason Sunshine
New York University (NYU)
Bobst Library, E-resource Acquisitions
20 Cooper Square 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10003-711
United States
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