Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1097407
 
 

Footnotes (35)



 


 



When - and Why - Do Hard Cases Make Bad Law? The GSP Dispute


Jeffrey L. Dunoff


Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law


THE WTO AND DEVELOPING NATIONS, G. Bermann, P. Mavroidis, eds., Cambridge University Press, 2007
Temple University Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2008-50

Abstract:     
Hard cases, Holmes famously declared, make bad law. But what makes a case hard? Do hard cases necessarily generate bad law? What strategies can courts use to minimize the likelihood of generating bad law?

There is widespread agreement that India's challenge to the EC's generalized system of preferences (GSP) presented the WTO's Appellate Body with a hard case. This short essay (i) discusses why conventional legal, economic and policy analysis are of only limited utility in explaining why the GSP case was so difficult, and in evaluating the Appellate Body's decision; (ii) addresses the appropriate role of the Appellate Body in difficult cases; and (iii) advances a rather unconventional explanation for why the GSP dispute was so difficult.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 11

Keywords: WTO, GSP, developing states, international trade

Accepted Paper Series





Download This Paper

Date posted: February 26, 2008 ; Last revised: November 4, 2008

Suggested Citation

Dunoff, Jeffrey L., When - and Why - Do Hard Cases Make Bad Law? The GSP Dispute. THE WTO AND DEVELOPING NATIONS, G. Bermann, P. Mavroidis, eds., Cambridge University Press, 2007; Temple University Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2008-50. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1097407

Contact Information

Jeffrey L. Dunoff (Contact Author)
Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law ( email )
1719 N. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States
215-204-8233 (Phone)
215-204-1185 (Fax)
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 1,295
Downloads: 298
Download Rank: 58,570
Footnotes:  35

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo8 in 0.266 seconds