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Light at the End of the Pipeline?: Choosing a Forum for Suspected Terrorists


Amos N. Guiora


University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law

John T. Parry


Lewis & Clark Law School

June 29, 2010

University Pennsylvania Law Review PENNUMBRA, Vol. 156, pp. 356-378, 2008
U of Utah Legal Studies Paper No. 08-04
Lewis & Clark Law School Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2008-16

Abstract:     
Despite the fact that six years have passed since 9/11, the Pentagon's recent decision to try six Guantanamo detainees for capital crimes such as terrorism and support of terrorism made national headlines. William Glaberson, "U.S. Charges 6 With Key Roles in 9/11 Attacks", N.Y. Times, Feb. 11, 2008, at A1. In this Debate, Professors Amos N. Guiora, of the University of Utah, and John T. Parry, of Lewis & Clark Law School, attempt to settle the question of what sort of forum is most appropriate to try the thousands of individuals in U.S. custody who are suspected of terrorism.

Professor Guiora considers three forum options: treaty-based international terror courts, traditional Article III courts, and a hybrid option he calls domestic terror courts. Ultimately, Professor Guiora argues in favor of domestic terror courts, which he describes as being able to balance the legitimate rights of the individual with the equally legitimate national security rights of the state. He considers this option to be the most practical and expedient policy solution, necessitated by an untenable tension between the understanding that some of the detainees present a genuine threat to American national security, and an awareness that indefinite detention violates constitutional principles and fundamental concepts of morality.

Professor Parry agrees that current U.S. policy toward detainees has been misguided, but does not believe that innovations of the sort proposed by Professor Guiora are necessary. Rather, he suggests that policymakers should choose Article III courts rather than hybrid courts for trials of suspected terrorists, with military courts as a fallback option. Professor Parry points to research that shows that the federal government is often able to prosecute suspected terrorists in federal court, and therefore considers alternative proposals to Article III courts to be solution[s] in search of a problem. Professor Parry realizes that trial in federal court will not be possible for every suspected terrorist, and concludes that, [f]or people who pose a risk but whose conduct may not violate federal criminal law, prolonged preventive detention is the best choice.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 23

Keywords: where to try terrorists, domestic terror court, Article III court, Military Commission, Military Tribunal, Guantanamo, detainees, individual rights, national security, constitutional rights, preventative detention

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Date posted: February 28, 2008 ; Last revised: June 29, 2010

Suggested Citation

Guiora, Amos N. and Parry, John T., Light at the End of the Pipeline?: Choosing a Forum for Suspected Terrorists (June 29, 2010). University Pennsylvania Law Review PENNUMBRA, Vol. 156, pp. 356-378, 2008 ; U of Utah Legal Studies Paper No. 08-04; Lewis & Clark Law School Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2008-16. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1099180

Contact Information

Amos N. Guiora
University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law ( email )
332 S. 1400 East Front
Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0730
United States
801-581-4295 (Phone)
801-581-6897 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://www.law.utah.edu/profiles/default.asp?PersonID=6581&name=Guiora,Amos..

John T. Parry (Contact Author)
Lewis & Clark Law School ( email )
10015 S.W. Terwilliger Blvd.
Portland, OR 97219
United States
503-768-6888 (Phone)
503-768-6671 (Fax)
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