Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1104064
 
 

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Discouraging Times: The Labor Force Participation of Married Black Women, 1930-1940


William A. Sundstrom


Santa Clara University - Leavey School of Business - Economics Department


Explorations in Economic History, Vol. 38, 2001

Abstract:     
The extraordinary unemployment rates of black women during the Great Depression caused a sizeable number to leave the labor force as "discouraged workers." Consequently, while married white women entered the labor force in increasing numbers, the participation rate of married black women stagnated. The higher unemployment of black women was not primarily a function of their occupational or industrial distribution, but reflected unequal treatment within markets. This article adds support to the view of black economic progress as episodic in nature, with the Depression as a period of relative retrenchment for African Americans.

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Date posted: March 9, 2008  

Suggested Citation

Sundstrom, William A., Discouraging Times: The Labor Force Participation of Married Black Women, 1930-1940. Explorations in Economic History, Vol. 38, 2001. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1104064

Contact Information

William A. Sundstrom (Contact Author)
Santa Clara University - Leavey School of Business - Economics Department ( email )
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA California 95053
United States
408-554-4341 (Phone)
408-554-2331 (Fax)
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