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http://ssrn.com/abstract=1129642
 
 

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Why Torts Die


Kyle Graham


Santa Clara University School of Law


Florida State University Law Review, Vol. 35, No. 2, 2008

Abstract:     
Alienation of affections. Claims for insult. Maintenance and champerty. Suits against saloonkeepers for spousal alcoholism. These are just a handful of the many torts that have disappeared, or are presently passing into history. Why Torts Die examines why these and other torts have vanished or are in danger of extinction. The central thesis of Why Torts Die is that the collapse of a tort typically owes to a confluence of compromising conditions or events. Changes in the ambient cultural atmosphere may threaten a tort theory, but the effects of these changes will be magnified or mitigated by several other factors: the nature, quality, and volume of critiques directed against the tort; the interests and limitations of the audiences that decide whether to retain or reject the cause of action; the relative power and influence of the tort's opponents and supporters; the availability and desirability of alternatives to the tort; and the intrinsic qualities of the threatened claim itself. To flesh out the hypothesis that most defunct torts haven't simply fallen victim to sudden cultural downdrafts, Why Torts Die offers three case studies, each detailing how a gravely endangered tort or torts came to find itself in that condition. This review of the diminutions of the tort of insult, of obesity lawsuits, and of the heartbalm torts (alienation of affections, breach of promise to marry, criminal conversation, and seduction) suggests that the disappearance of a tort is typically a complicated affair, implicating several of the factors discussed above.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 74

Keywords: torts, legal history

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Date posted: May 8, 2008  

Suggested Citation

Graham, Kyle, Why Torts Die. Florida State University Law Review, Vol. 35, No. 2, 2008. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1129642

Contact Information

Kyle Graham (Contact Author)
Santa Clara University School of Law ( email )
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95053
United States
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