Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1133917
 
 

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An Empirical Test of Taste-Based Discrimination Changes in Ethnic Preferences and Their Effect on Admissions to the Nyse During World War I


Petra Moser


Stanford University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

May 2008

NBER Working Paper No. w14003

Abstract:     
A significant challenge to empirically testing theories of discrimination has been the difficulty of identifying taste-based discrimination and of distinguishing it clearly from statistical discrimination. This paper addresses this problem through a two-part empirical test of taste-based discrimination. First, it constructs measures of revealed preferences, which establish that World War I created a strong and persistent shock to ethnic preferences that effectively switched the status of German Americans to an ethnic minority. Second, the paper uses this shock to ethnic preferences to identify the effects of taste-based discrimination at the example of traders at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). A new data set of more than 4,000 applications for seats on the NYSE reveals that the War more than doubled the probability that German applicants would be rejected (relative to Anglo-Saxons). The mechanism of taste-based discrimination is surprising: Prices are unaffected by ethnic preferences, and discrimination operates instead entirely through admissions.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 42

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Date posted: May 16, 2008  

Suggested Citation

Moser, Petra, An Empirical Test of Taste-Based Discrimination Changes in Ethnic Preferences and Their Effect on Admissions to the Nyse During World War I (May 2008). NBER Working Paper No. w14003. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1133917

Contact Information

Petra Moser (Contact Author)
Stanford University - Department of Economics ( email )
Landau Economics Building
579 Serra Mall
Stanford, CA 94305-6072
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
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