Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1141359
 
 

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Police Interviewing and Interrogation: A Self-Report Survey of Police Practices and Beliefs


Richard A. Leo


University of San Francisco - School of Law

Saul M. Kassin


John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Christian A. Meissner


National Science Foundation - Law & Social Sciences Program Director; University of Texas at El Paso - Departments of Psychology & Criminal Justice

Kimberly D. Richman


University of San Francisco - College of Arts & Sciences

Lori H. Colwell


Connecticut Valley Hospital

Amy Leach


Queen's University

Dana La Fon


Loyola College in Maryland

2007

Law and Human Behavior, Vol. 31, 2007
Univ. of San Francisco Law Research Paper No. 2010-12

Abstract:     
By questionnaire, 631 police investigators reported on their interrogation beliefs and practices - the first such survey ever conducted. Overall, participants estimated that they were 77 percent accurate at truth and lie detection, that 81 percent of suspects waive Miranda rights, that the mean length of interrogation is 1.6 hours, and that they elicit self-incriminating statements from 68 percent of suspects, 4.78 percent from innocents. Overall, 81 percent felt that interrogations should be recorded. As for self-reported usage of various interrogation tactics, the most common were to physically isolate suspects, identify contradictions in suspects' accounts, establish rapport, confront suspects with evidence of their guilt, and appeal to self-interests. Results were discussed for their consistency with prior research, policy implications, and methodological shortcomings.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 21

Keywords: criminal procedure, criminal justice, law enforcement, interrogation tactics

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Date posted: June 7, 2008 ; Last revised: April 27, 2010

Suggested Citation

Leo, Richard A. and Kassin, Saul M. and Meissner, Christian A. and Richman, Kimberly D. and Colwell, Lori H. and Leach, Amy and La Fon, Dana, Police Interviewing and Interrogation: A Self-Report Survey of Police Practices and Beliefs (2007). Law and Human Behavior, Vol. 31, 2007; Univ. of San Francisco Law Research Paper No. 2010-12. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1141359

Contact Information

Richard A. Leo (Contact Author)
University of San Francisco - School of Law ( email )
2130 Fulton Street
San Francisco, CA 94117
United States
Saul M. Kassin
John Jay College of Criminal Justice ( email )
695 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10021
United States
Christian A. Meissner
National Science Foundation - Law & Social Sciences Program Director ( email )
4201 Wilson Boulevard
Arlington, VA 22230
United States
University of Texas at El Paso - Departments of Psychology & Criminal Justice ( email )
500 West University
El Paso, TX TX 79968-0545
United States
Kimberly D. Richman
University of San Francisco - College of Arts & Sciences ( email )
San Francisco, CA 94117
United States
Lori H. Colwell
Connecticut Valley Hospital ( email )
Whiting Forensic Division
P.O. Box 70, O'Brien Drive
Middletown, CT 06457
United States
860-262-6891 (Phone)
860-262-5466 (Fax)
Amy Leach
Queen's University (Canada) ( email )
Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6
Canada
Dana La Fon
Loyola College in Maryland ( email )
Baltimore, MD 21210
United States
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