Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1143024
 


 



Racial Suffering as Human Suffering: An Existentially-Grounded Humanity Consciousness as a Guide to a Fourteenth Amendment Reborn


Rhonda V. Magee


University of San Francisco

2004

Temple Political & Civil Rights Law Review, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2004

Abstract:     
This essay further explores the author's proposed Humanity Consciousness approach -- a jurisprudential, methodological and pedagogical tool to assist in reinterpreting and reconstructing law and public policy and deconstructing its structural alignment with white supremacy and racism. The focus of this essay is on the links between critical race theory, the philosophy of existence (i.e., existentialism) and a liberation-focused Humanity Consciousness. The author demonstrates the important but still underappreciated role to be played by the analysis of lived-experience and personal inquiry narrative (what anthropologists call "autoethnography") in understanding the full nature of racial harm. Grappling with the nature of racial harm by analyzing all our stories supports an alternative approach to post-slavery Constitutional theory - and specifically in this essay, to Fourteenth Amendment jurisprudence: one that embodies a commitment to law and politics aimed at fulfilling the full promise of the Reconstruction Amendments to uplift, liberate and create the conditions for a post-racist America.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 36

Keywords: Fourteenth Amendment, Reconstruction Amendments, Humanity Consciousness, existentialism, critical race theory

JEL Classification: K10

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Date posted: June 18, 2008 ; Last revised: January 21, 2010

Suggested Citation

Magee, Rhonda V., Racial Suffering as Human Suffering: An Existentially-Grounded Humanity Consciousness as a Guide to a Fourteenth Amendment Reborn (2004). Temple Political & Civil Rights Law Review, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2004. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1143024

Contact Information

Rhonda V. Magee (Contact Author)
University of San Francisco ( email )
2130 Fulton Street
San Francisco, CA 94117
United States
415-422-5055 (Phone)
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