Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1147427
 
 

Footnotes (93)



 


 



The Impact of Government-Mandated Public Access to Biomedical Research: An Analysis of the New NIH Depository Requirements


Kristopher A. Nelson


University of California, San Diego (UCSD)

June 1, 2008

Albany Law Journal of Science and Technology, Vol. 19, No. 2, April/May 2009

Abstract:     
On December 26, 2007, President Bush signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2008. The bill, which became Public Law 110-161, contained a new requirement that manuscripts developed through funding by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) be made available to the public, free of charge, within one year after publication. This new mandatory requirement struck a compromise position between the existing pay-to-access model of private journal publishers and the potential free-for-all of the public domain. But did it go far enough? Should Congress have adopted a more aggressive policy of opening access to research? Alternatively, did Congress go too far, and as a result have we crippled scientific publishing?

Number of Pages in PDF File: 34

Keywords: biomedical, NIH, research, open access, public access, scientific publishing

Accepted Paper Series





Download This Paper

Date posted: June 18, 2008 ; Last revised: May 25, 2014

Suggested Citation

Nelson, Kristopher A., The Impact of Government-Mandated Public Access to Biomedical Research: An Analysis of the New NIH Depository Requirements (June 1, 2008). Albany Law Journal of Science and Technology, Vol. 19, No. 2, April/May 2009. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1147427

Contact Information

Kristopher A. Nelson (Contact Author)
University of California, San Diego (UCSD) ( email )
9500 Gilman Drive
Mail Code 0502
La Jolla, CA 92093-0112
United States
HOME PAGE: http://www.ekris.org
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 776
Downloads: 71
Download Rank: 197,800
Footnotes:  93

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo3 in 0.390 seconds