Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=11475
 


 



Cryptography and Liberty: 'Can the Trusted Third Parties Be Trusted?: A Critique of the Recent UK Proposals'


Yaman Akdeniz


Faculty of Law, Istanbul Bilgi University

Oliver Clarke


CommUnity

Alistair Kelman


London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Computer Security Research Centre

Andrew Oram


O'Reilly and Associates

August 8, 2011

Journal of Information Technology, Vol. 2, 1997

Abstract:     
Computer encryption is part of the basic infrastructure for modern digital commerce and communications. Recently it has been the subject of various proposals from the U.K. government, as well as governments in several other countries and the European Union as a whole. Whilst these proposals claim to address both the goal of improving commerce through better encryption and that of facilitating access to encrypted communications by law enforcement, the impact of the proposals is in fact to impair the former goal in order to favor the latter. They tend to call for `key escrow' or `key recovery' systems that centralize sensitive keys in databases (at `Trusted Third Parties') and permit government access in a manner similar to that in which phone wiretaps are currently conducted. This paper examines several proposals, especially the March 1997 Consultation Paper from the Department of Trade & Industry entitled `Licensing of Trusted Third Parties for the Provision of Encryption Services', and assesses their implications. We argue that key escrow represents an unprecedented intrusion on individual privacy, holds back the development of digital communications and commerce, and does not achieve the government's stated goals of helping to prevent crime. As an alternative, to address problems of law enforcement in electronic commerce and to facilitate the prosecution of crimes, we suggest a compromise proposal which we call `key archiving.'

Accepted Paper Series


Not Available For Download

Date posted: October 8, 1997 ; Last revised: February 27, 2014

Suggested Citation

Akdeniz, Yaman and Clarke, Oliver and Kelman, Alistair and Oram, Andrew, Cryptography and Liberty: 'Can the Trusted Third Parties Be Trusted?: A Critique of the Recent UK Proposals' (August 8, 2011). Journal of Information Technology, Vol. 2, 1997. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=11475

Contact Information

Yaman Akdeniz (Contact Author)
Faculty of Law, Istanbul Bilgi University ( email )
Kurtuluş Deresi Caddesi, Yahya Köprüsü Sokak No: 1
34440 Dolapdere, Beyoğlu
Istanbul
Turkey
Oliver Clarke
CommUnity ( email )
375 Rochdale Road
Bury, Lanc's, BL9 7D
United Kingdom
011-44-161-959 2350 (Phone)
011-44-161-856 3006 (Fax)
Alistair Kelman
London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Computer Security Research Centre ( email )
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom
011-44 181 202 5675 (Phone)
011-44 181 202 8045 (Fax)
Andrew Oram
O'Reilly and Associates ( email )
90 Sherman St
Cambridge, MA 02140-3233
617-499-7479 (Phone)
617-661-1116 (Fax)
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