Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1158342
 
 

References (30)



 
 

Citations (19)



 


 



Being the New York Times: The Political Behaviour of a Newspaper


Riccardo Puglisi


University of Pavia; University of Milan - Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano (LdA)

April 2006

LSE STICERD Research Paper No. PEPP20

Abstract:     
I analyze a dataset of news from the New York Times, from 1946 to 1997. Controlling for the incumbent President's activity across issues, I find that during the presidential campaign the New York Times gives more emphasis to topics that are owned by the Democratic party (civil rights, health care, labor and social welfare), when the incumbent President is a Republican. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the New York Times has a Democratic partisanship, with some "watchdog" aspects, in that -during the presidential campaign- it gives more emphasis to issues over which the (Republican) incumbent is weak. In the post-1960 period the Times displays a more symmetric type of watchdog behaviour, just because during presidential campaigns it gives more more coverage to the typically Republican issue of Defense when the incumbent President is a Democrat, and less so when the incumbent is a Republican.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 50

JEL Classification: D72, D78, L82

working papers series


Download This Paper

Date posted: July 11, 2008  

Suggested Citation

Puglisi, Riccardo, Being the New York Times: The Political Behaviour of a Newspaper (April 2006). LSE STICERD Research Paper No. PEPP20. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1158342

Contact Information

Riccardo Puglisi (Contact Author)
University of Pavia ( email )
Corso Strada Nuova, 65
27100 Pavia, 27100
Italy
University of Milan - Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano (LdA) ( email )
Via P. Amedeo 34
Milano, Mi 20122
Italy
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 962
Downloads: 95
Download Rank: 6,636
References:  30
Citations:  19

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo7 in 0.312 seconds