Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1160880
 


 



The Development of Black Police Associations: Changing Articulations of Race within the Police


Simon Holdaway


affiliation not provided to SSRN

Megan O'Neill


University of Sheffield

November 2004

The British Journal of Criminology, Vol. 44, Issue 6, pp. 854-865, 2004

Abstract:     
This paper examines the initial development of Black Police Associations in England and Wales, giving special attention to the first association-the Metropolitan Police Black Police Association. It is argued that a background of change from an individualistic to a collective understanding of race relations within constabularies can be identified in key public documents. This change has had important implications for police understandings of the problems faced by ethnic-minority police staff. A process of change from ethnic minority officers as individuals to membership of an ethnic network and, subsequently, an ethnic association will be analysed. The emergence of Black Police Associations represents a new articulation of race within constabularies and an organizational form of relevance to both the profile and influence of ethnic minority police staff, as well as the managerialism of New Labour, implemented in constabularies by chief officers.

Keywords: SF-36, Health-related quality of life, Mental health, Physical health, Systemic lupus erythematosus

Accepted Paper Series





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Date posted: July 16, 2008  

Suggested Citation

Holdaway, Simon and O'Neill, Megan, The Development of Black Police Associations: Changing Articulations of Race within the Police (November 2004). The British Journal of Criminology, Vol. 44, Issue 6, pp. 854-865, 2004. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1160880 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azh046

Contact Information

Simon Holdaway (Contact Author)
affiliation not provided to SSRN
No Address Available
Megan O'Neill
University of Sheffield ( email )
17 Mappin Street
Sheffield, S1 4DT
United Kingdom
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