Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1260387
 


 



J.S. Mill and the American Law of Quarantine


Wendy E. Parmet


Northeastern University - School of Law

August 28, 2008

Public Health Ethics, 2008
Northeastern University School of Law Research Paper No. 23-2008

Abstract:     
This paper looks at the American law of quarantine in light of the teachings of John Stuart Mill, whose harm principle has often been used to justify the practice of isolating and/or quarantining individuals to prevent the spread of an infectious disease. The paper shows that despite important parallels between quarantine law and both the authorizing and prohibitive aspects of Mill's harm principle, the contemporary law of quarantine does not reflect either Mill's concern for the potential abuse of executive authority nor his recognition that quarantine is only ethically justified when the broader public health policy environment in which quarantine is applied is itself ethically sound.

Accepted Paper Series


Not Available For Download

Date posted: September 30, 2008  

Suggested Citation

Parmet, Wendy E., J.S. Mill and the American Law of Quarantine (August 28, 2008). Public Health Ethics, 2008; Northeastern University School of Law Research Paper No. 23-2008. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1260387

Contact Information

Wendy E. Parmet (Contact Author)
Northeastern University - School of Law ( email )
400 Huntington Ave.
Boston, MA 02115
United States
(617) 373-2019 (Phone)
(617) 373-5056 (Fax)
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 1,275

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo3 in 0.297 seconds