Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1280929
 
 

Footnotes (198)



 


 



The Laptop-Free Zone


Jana R. McCreary


Florida Coastal School of Law

October 8, 2008

Valparaiso University Law Review, Vol. 43, 2009

Abstract:     
This new article, "The Laptop-Free Zone," addresses the hotly debated issue of laptops in law school classroom; those debates are ongoing on countless blogs, on NPR, in national newspapers, and across law school campuses. This article reports and analyzes the data collected through an IRB-approved survey of almost 450 law school students at three different law schools regarding the students' views of laptops and reported distractions caused by laptops. To provide context, the article also addresses the current arguments against laptops, negating those points as being outweighed by the proper and beneficial use of laptops. Additionally, the article provides information to be considered in teaching adults and to different learning styles, namely, global and analytic learners, and how those concerns are matters to consider in the laptop debate.

According to the survey results, students who do not use a laptop are overwhelmingly more likely to be distracted by others' laptops than students who are using their own laptops. In other words, yes, laptops cause distractions, but that primarily affects students who are not using a laptop. Accordingly, based on the learning style information and my survey results, I suggest that laptops not be banned from law school classrooms. Instead, I argue that professors must do their best to teach to all students - to those who feel they learn best by using a laptop as an aid and to those who complain of the distractions caused. I do this by implementing a laptop-free zone, restricting the first or first few rows in my classrooms to no laptops. This creates an area where students who are distracted by neighboring screens and nearby typing are free (as possible without an all-out ban) from those distractions. Further, doing so still respects those students who have learned to use a laptop as an educational tool.

As a surprise to me, the survey also showed that many students make the decision to give up their laptop after experiencing attending a class without one, noting they would not have been willing to go through such an experience by their own decision. However, once they experience not using a laptop in the law school classroom environment, they often change their method of taking notes and report improved learning and classroom experiences. Accordingly, I also suggest that instead of banning laptops, we provide beginning students with only a week or two of a laptop ban at some time during the first semester of school. This compromise will serve the interest of the most students most effectively, respecting them as adults while providing supportive guidance to their own decisions about their learning environment.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 92

Keywords: laptops, learning theory, pedagogy, classroom technology, computers

Accepted Paper Series





Download This Paper

Date posted: October 8, 2008 ; Last revised: December 12, 2012

Suggested Citation

McCreary, Jana R., The Laptop-Free Zone (October 8, 2008). Valparaiso University Law Review, Vol. 43, 2009. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1280929

Contact Information

Jana R. McCreary (Contact Author)
Florida Coastal School of Law ( email )
8787 Baypine Rd.
Jacksonville, FL 32256
United States
904-256-1222 (Phone)
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 3,423
Downloads: 277
Download Rank: 63,643
Footnotes:  198

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo3 in 0.343 seconds