Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1300641
 
 

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Choose the Best Answer: Organizing Climate Change Negotiation in the Obama Administration


Jonathan Zasloff


University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Law


Northwestern University Law Review: Colloquy, Vol. 102, 2009
UCLA School of Law Research Paper No. 08-36

Abstract:     
This article considers which federal agency should assume the lead negotiating role if the next President wants to re-engage with international climate change negotiation. I disagree with current law, which gives the State Department leading status. I also part company with the recommendations of some commentators, who suggest that the President should assign the task to the EPA, a special climate change negotiator, or some sort of "climate czar." Instead, I suggest that the United States Trade Representative is best suited to assume the responsibility for reconnecting the United States with the international climate change negotiation process and reasserting American leadership in that process.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 27

Keywords: International climate change negotiation, U.S. government reorganization, U.S. Trade Representative

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Date posted: November 16, 2008 ; Last revised: December 21, 2008

Suggested Citation

Zasloff, Jonathan, Choose the Best Answer: Organizing Climate Change Negotiation in the Obama Administration. Northwestern University Law Review: Colloquy, Vol. 102, 2009; UCLA School of Law Research Paper No. 08-36. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1300641

Contact Information

Jonathan Zasloff (Contact Author)
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Law ( email )
385 Charles E. Young Dr. East
Room 1242
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1476
United States
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