Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1308496
 
 

Citations (5)



 


 



The Internet: Still Wide Open and Competitive?


Eli M. Noam


Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics; Columbia Business School - Institute for Tele Information; Columbia University

Donald Hay


University of Oxford - Department of Economics

Michael R. Baye


Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Business Economics & Public Policy

John Morgan


University of California, Berkeley - Economic Analysis & Policy Group

August 1, 2003

OII Internet Issue Brief No. 1

Abstract:     
For many years now, the Internet seemed to be open, free, and competitive. Internet entrepreneurialism was high, financing easy, entry barriers low. But now, in the wake of the Internet's bursting bubble, the reality of that competitiveness deserves a second look: Is the Internet still as open and competitive as it used to be, or is it becoming concentrated and dominated by a few firms with market power? To even ask this question raises emotional responses, so deeply held is the Internet's self-image of openness and competitiveness, in contrast to the stodginess of the telecom, print, and TV industries.

Many people even have difficulty with the very concept of looking at the Internet as an industry. The early phases of the medium were indeed dominated by government, universities, and non-profit entities, all operating outside of private markets. But even when the Internet became commercialized, it was frequently asserted that the new 'bit economy' operated on fundamentally different principles than the traditional 'atom economy'.

Today, a more balanced perspective has become possible and necessary. This starts with the recognition that the Internet is a set of interacting activities provided by a variety of business firms, operating in interacting sub-markets. The structure of those markets affect, in the classic paradigm of industrial economics, the behavior and hence the performance of these firms. A prime measure for market structure is the extent of market concentration; it is an indicator and predictor of competitive behavior. Since the Internet has been arguably the major force for economic, societal, and cultural innovation in society in recent years, the extent of the competitive forces driving it is significant far beyond the sector itself.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 19

Keywords: internet, competition, market power, openness, bit economy, innovation

working papers series


Download This Paper

Date posted: December 1, 2008 ; Last revised: May 11, 2014

Suggested Citation

Noam, Eli M. and Hay, Donald and Baye, Michael R. and Morgan, John, The Internet: Still Wide Open and Competitive? (August 1, 2003). OII Internet Issue Brief No. 1. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1308496 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1308496

Contact Information

Eli M. Noam (Contact Author)
Columbia Business School - Finance and Economics ( email )
3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States

Columbia Business School - Institute for Tele Information ( email )
3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States
Columbia University ( email )
3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States
Donald Hay
University of Oxford - Department of Economics ( email )
Manor Road Building
Manor Road
Oxford, OX1 3BJ
United Kingdom
Michael Roy Baye
Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Business Economics & Public Policy ( email )
Bloomington, IN 47405
United States
812-855-2779 (Phone)
812-855-3354 (Fax)

John Morgan
University of California, Berkeley - Economic Analysis & Policy Group ( email )
Berkeley, CA 94720
United States
510-642-2669 (Phone)
810-885-5959 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://faculty.haas.berkeley.edu/rjmorgan/
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 926
Downloads: 186
Download Rank: 82,981
Citations:  5
Paper comments
No comments have been made on this paper

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo8 in 0.281 seconds