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A Lawyer's Worst Nightmare: The Story of a Lawyer and His Nurse Clients Who Were Both Criminally Charged because the Nurses Resigned En Mass


Mitchell H. Rubinstein


New York Law School; Rutgers University School of Management and Labor Relations

January 19, 2009

Northwestern Law Review Colloquy, Vol. 103, p. 317, 2009

Abstract:     
Imagine that a group of foreign registered nurses approach their lawyer because they feel abused and want to quit their jobs. They signed an employment contract agreeing to remain employed for three years and are unsure of their rights. The contract that they signed also contains a $25,000 liquidated damage provision. The lawyer advised his clients that they have to right to quit, and after they quit, the lawyer and his clients find themselves at the center of a massive criminal and civil controversy. Both the lawyer and his clients are criminally charged with endangering the welfare of critically ill pediatric patients and related crimes because the nurses resigned en masse without notice. You might think that such a case could not arise in Twenty-First Century America, but in 2007 that is exactly what occurred in Suffolk County New York and resulted in a New York appellate court having to prohibit the criminal prosecution of both the nurses and their attorney. Matter of Vinluan v. Doyle, ___A.D.3d___, 2009 WL 93065 (2d. Dep't. Jan. 13, 2009).

This Essay examines this troubling case, where the court held that such a prosecution offended the Thirteenth Amendment and the attorneys First Amendment right to provide legal advice to his clients. This Essay explores the public policy issues raised by this case, whether nurses have the same right to withhold their labor as other employees, as well as certain issues which the court did not reach such as whether criminal prosecution of the nurses is preempted by the National Labor Relations Act. Additionally, this Essay explores legal issues surrounding the criminal prosecution of an attorney based on advice he may have given which the court ultimately found to be "profoundly disturbing." The Essay concludes by explaining that the liquidated damage provision, which may have sparked this entire controversy, was probably unenforceable as a penalty, another issue not reached by the court, that criminal prosecution of both the nurses and their attorney was unwarranted and that the Appellate Division decision was correctly decided.

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Date posted: January 19, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Rubinstein, Mitchell H., A Lawyer's Worst Nightmare: The Story of a Lawyer and His Nurse Clients Who Were Both Criminally Charged because the Nurses Resigned En Mass (January 19, 2009). Northwestern Law Review Colloquy, Vol. 103, p. 317, 2009. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1330049

Contact Information

Mitchell H. Rubinstein (Contact Author)
New York Law School ( email )
52 Broadway, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10004
United States
212-533-6300 (Phone)
212-995-2347 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/adjunctprofs/
Rutgers University School of Management and Labor Relations ( email )
New Brunswick, NJ
United States
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