Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1345368
 
 

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Zoning, Transportation, and Climate Change


John R. Nolon


Pace University School of Law

2007

New York Zoning Law and Practice Report, Vol. 8, No. 2, September/October 2007

Abstract:     
On February 2, 2006, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) expressed the consensus of the scientific community that global warming is unequivocal and that its main driver is human activity. On April 7, 2007, the IPCC issued a second report detailing the likely consequences of climate change: widening droughts, more severe storm events, increased inland flooding, sea level rise, and consequent inundation of low lying lands. The Center for Climate Systems Research at Columbia University estimates that sea levels around New York City's boroughs will increase by five inches by 2030, with some estimates predicting up to 12 inches more between 2030 and 2080. The biggest threat to the safety of millions of city dwellers and its trillions of dollars of real property is the prospect of increasingly vicious storms that may propel encroaching waters onto the shore and threaten the stability of vulnerable buildings.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 12

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Date posted: February 23, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Nolon, John R., Zoning, Transportation, and Climate Change (2007). New York Zoning Law and Practice Report, Vol. 8, No. 2, September/October 2007. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1345368

Contact Information

John R. Nolon (Contact Author)
Pace University School of Law ( email )
78 North Broadway
White Plains, NY 10603
United States
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