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Is Silence Sacred? The Vulnerability of Griffin v. California in a Terrorist World


Lissa Griffin


Pace University School of Law

2007

William & Mary Bill of Rights, Vol. 15, 2007

Abstract:     
Part I of this Article traces the shared history of the right against self-incrimination from twelfth-century England to the mid-twentieth century. Part II examines the modem history of the privilege in the United States, from the Supreme Court's 1965 decision in Grifin to its 1999 decision in Mitchell. Part Ill examines the United Kingdom's modem approach to the privilege, including its re-shaping of the privilege in response to domestic terrorism. Part IV examines why the U.S. and U.K. systems, with a common history and shared values, have moved in such dramatically different directions with respect to the privilege. Part V assesses the possibility that the privilege, already vulnerable, will be curtailed by the new Court along the lines of the United Kingdom's procedures.

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Date posted: February 26, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Griffin, Lissa, Is Silence Sacred? The Vulnerability of Griffin v. California in a Terrorist World (2007). William & Mary Bill of Rights, Vol. 15, 2007. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1349299

Contact Information

Lissa Griffin (Contact Author)
Pace University School of Law ( email )
78 North Broadway
White Plains, NY 10603
United States
914-422-4231 (Phone)
HOME PAGE: http://www.pace.edu/page.cfm?doc_id=23170
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