Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1354089
 
 

Citations (2)



 


 



The Arrow of the Law in Modern Administrative States: Using Complexity Theory to Reveal the Diminishing Returns and Increasing Risks the Burgeoning of Law Poses to Society


J. B. Ruhl


Vanderbilt University - Law School

Harold J. Ruhl


affiliation not provided to SSRN

March 5, 2009

UC Davis Law Review, Vol. 30, 1997
FSU College of Law, Public Law Research

Abstract:     
This article is the third in my series of articles exploring the application of complex adaptive systems (CAS) theory to legal systems. Building on the model outlined in the first two installments (in the Duke and Vanderbilt law reviews), this work examines the "arrow" or direction of the legal system in the context of the administrative state. Drawing from diverse work such as Burke's study of history's nonlinearity and Tainter's classic study of the collapse of complex civilizations, we argue that the administrative state is becoming too resource intensive and burdened by a proliferation of rules.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 78

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: March 7, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Ruhl, J. B. and Ruhl, Harold J., The Arrow of the Law in Modern Administrative States: Using Complexity Theory to Reveal the Diminishing Returns and Increasing Risks the Burgeoning of Law Poses to Society (March 5, 2009). UC Davis Law Review, Vol. 30, 1997; FSU College of Law, Public Law Research. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1354089

Contact Information

J. B. Ruhl (Contact Author)
Vanderbilt University - Law School ( email )
131 21st Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37203-1181
United States
Harold J. Ruhl
affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 589
Downloads: 120
Download Rank: 137,373
Citations:  2
People who downloaded this paper also downloaded:
1. Law's Complexity - A Primer
By J. B. Ruhl

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo3 in 0.344 seconds