Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1354610
 
 

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Tort Duties of Landowners: A Positive Theory


Keith N. Hylton


Boston University; Professor of Law, Boston University School of Law

March 6, 2009

Boston Univ. School of Law Working Paper No. 09-12

Abstract:     
One of the most controversial areas of modern tort law is that of the duty of landowners toward people who visit their land. The common law divided land visitors into three types: invitees, licensees, and trespassers. The highest duty of care was owed to the invitee and the lowest to the trespasser. The distinctions led courts to hand down harsh decisions and to draw formal lines between the categories that seemed to defy common sense at times. This paper explains the incentive-based function of the classical landowner duties. I will argue that the classical duties served useful regulatory functions. The most important was regulating the overall scale of injuries by imposing the risk of latent defective conditions in property to the party who is most likely to be aware of the risk or to take action to avoid the risk.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 21

Keywords: torts, duty of landowners toward people who visit their land, invitees, licensees, trespassers, regulatory functions of landowner duties

JEL Classification: K00, K11, K13

Accepted Paper Series





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Date posted: March 7, 2009 ; Last revised: April 7, 2009

Suggested Citation

Hylton, Keith N., Tort Duties of Landowners: A Positive Theory (March 6, 2009). Boston Univ. School of Law Working Paper No. 09-12. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1354610

Contact Information

Keith N. Hylton (Contact Author)
Boston University ( email )
595 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
United States
617-353-8959 (Phone)
Professor of Law, Boston University School of Law ( email )
765 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
United States
617-353-8959 (Phone)
617-353-3077 (Fax)
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