Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1361944
 


 



The Press as an Interest Group: Mainstream Media in the United States Supreme Court


Eric Easton


University of Baltimore - School of Law

Summer 2007

UCLA Entertainment Law Review, Vol. 14, No. 2, 2007

Abstract:     
There can be little doubt that the institutional press is an interest group to be reckoned with in the Supreme Court, its aversion to such a designation notwithstanding. Over the past century, and especially since 1964, the press has secured for itself the greatest legal protection available anywhere in the world. While some of that protection has come from Congress, by far the greatest share has come from the Supreme Court's expansive interpretation of the First Amendment's Press Clause.

Although the role of the press in American politics has been studied extensively for nearly two centuries, the role of the press as a powerful interest group has yet to be examined in full. This quantitative study examines 100 U.S. Supreme Court decisions in which the mainstream media was a party litigant or amicus curiae. Among other findings, the study demonstrates that the press has been extremely successful in cases involving content regulation, but far less so in cases involving news gathering.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 18

Keywords: interest groups, media, Supreme Court, press

JEL Classification: K19, K39

Accepted Paper Series


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Date posted: March 26, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Easton, Eric, The Press as an Interest Group: Mainstream Media in the United States Supreme Court (Summer 2007). UCLA Entertainment Law Review, Vol. 14, No. 2, 2007. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1361944

Contact Information

Eric Easton (Contact Author)
University of Baltimore - School of Law ( email )
1420 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218
United States
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