Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1389511
 
 

Footnotes (299)



 


 



Interrogation's Law


William Ranney Levi


Yale University - Law School

April 17, 2009

Yale Law Journal, Vol. 118, p. 1434, 2009

Abstract:     
Conventional wisdom states that recent U.S. authorization of coercive interrogation techniques, and the legal decisions that sanctioned them, constitute a dramatic break with the past. This is false. U.S. interrogation policy well prior to 9/11 has allowed a great deal more flexibility than the high-minded legal prohibitions of coercive tactics would suggest: all interrogation methods allegedly authorized since 9/11, with the possible exception of waterboarding, have been authorized before. The conventional wisdom thus elides an intrinsic characteristic of all former and current laws on interrogation: they are vague and contestable, and thus, when context so demands, manipulable.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 50

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: April 18, 2009 ; Last revised: October 6, 2009

Suggested Citation

Levi, William Ranney, Interrogation's Law (April 17, 2009). Yale Law Journal, Vol. 118, p. 1434, 2009. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1389511

Contact Information

William Ranney Levi (Contact Author)
Yale University - Law School ( email )
P.O. Box 208215
New Haven, CT 06520-8215
United States

Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 5,943
Downloads: 1,248
Download Rank: 7,446
Footnotes:  299

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo5 in 0.593 seconds