Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1397191
 


 



Let Justice Be Done, Though the Heavens May Fall: The Law of Freedom


Paul Finkelman


Albany Law School - Government Law Center

1994

Chicago-Kent Law Review, Vol. 70, No. 2, 1994

Abstract:     
In May 1772 Lord Mansfield, Chief Justice of the Court of King's Bench in England, heard preliminary arguments in the case of James Somerset, a Virginia slave who claimed his freedom under English common law. Charles Stewart, Somerset's master, wanted to send the slave to Jamaica to be sold. Somerset sought a writ of habeas corpus to escape this fate. This action brought the legality of slavery before the highest court in Great Britain.

This case would serve as the precedent for freeing slaves in a number of jurisdictions outside of Great Britain. Yet, Somerset did not bring immediate freedom to all slaves in England; as late as the 1830s at least some blacks were probably enslaved in Great Britain. And, Somerset surely had little immediate impact on most of the Empire, where slavery existed for another half century.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 46

Keywords: Somerset, Mansfield

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Date posted: April 30, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Finkelman, Paul, Let Justice Be Done, Though the Heavens May Fall: The Law of Freedom (1994). Chicago-Kent Law Review, Vol. 70, No. 2, 1994. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1397191

Contact Information

Paul Finkelman (Contact Author)
Albany Law School - Government Law Center ( email )
80 New Scotland Avenue
Albany, NY 12208
United States

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