Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1401524
 


 



Tribal Membership and 'Indian Status': Federal Indian Law in the Post-Martinez World


Rebecca A. Tsosie


Arizona State University (ASU) - Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

2002

Native Americas, Vol. 19, 2002

Abstract:     
In this article, Professor Tsosie describes the importance of legally establishing Indian status or tribal membership for purposes of federal Indian law. She also explores the decision making process and who determines Indian status. Ultimately, recognition of Indian status or tribal membership affect tribal sovereignty and Native peoples cultural perspectives. Additionally, these matters significantly impact Indian law jurisprudence. Professor Tsosie refers to a particular important case, Santa Clara Pueblo v. Martinez, to demonstrate how the Supreme Court decided on issues of Indian status. Professor Tsosie concludes that usually the federal government relies on individual tribes to determine membership and status.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 5

Keywords: Indian status, Tribal membership, Native people

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Date posted: May 9, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Tsosie, Rebecca A., Tribal Membership and 'Indian Status': Federal Indian Law in the Post-Martinez World (2002). Native Americas, Vol. 19, 2002. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1401524

Contact Information

Rebecca A. Tsosie (Contact Author)
Arizona State University (ASU) - Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law ( email )
Box 877906
Tempe, AZ 85287-7906
United States
480-965-2714 (Phone)
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