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http://ssrn.com/abstract=1405963
 
 

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Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: Evidence from Blackjack Tables


Bruce I. Carlin


University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Anderson School of Management

David T. Robinson


Duke University - Fuqua School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

May 2009

NBER Working Paper No. w14955

Abstract:     
Psychologists study regret primarily by measuring subjects' attitudes in laboratory experiments. This does not shed light on how expected regret affects economic actions in market settings. To address this, we use proprietary data from a blackjack table in Las Vegas to analyze how expected regret affects peoples''decisions during gambles. Even among a group of people who choose to participate in a risk-taking activity, we find strong evidence of an economically significant omission bias: players incur substantial losses by playing too conservatively. This behavior is prevalent even among large stakes gamblers, and becomes more severe following previous aggressive play, suggesting a rebound effect after aggressive play.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 34

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Date posted: May 19, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Carlin, Bruce I. and Robinson, David T., Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: Evidence from Blackjack Tables (May 2009). NBER Working Paper No. w14955. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1405963

Contact Information

Bruce I. Carlin (Contact Author)
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Anderson School of Management ( email )
110 Westwood Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1481
United States
David T. Robinson
Duke University - Fuqua School of Business ( email )
Box 90120
Durham, NC 27708-0120
United States
919-660-8023 (Phone)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
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