Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1407187
 
 

Footnotes (75)



 


 



Private Cops on the Fraud Beat: The Limits of American Business Self-Regulation, 1895–1932


Edward Balleisen


Duke University

May 19, 2009

Business History Review, Vol. 83, No. 1, 2009

Abstract:     
From the late 1890s through the 1920s, a new set of nonprofit, business-funded organizations spearheaded an American campaign against commercial duplicity. These new organizations shaped the legal terrain of fraud, built massive public-education campaigns, and created a private law-enforcement capacity to rival that of the federal government. Largely born out of a desire among business elites to fend off proposals for extensive regulatory oversight of commercial speech, the antifraud crusade grew into a social movement that was influenced by prevailing ideas about social hygiene and emerging techniques of private governance. This initiative highlighted some enduring strengths of business self-regulation, such as agility in responding to regulatory problems; it also revealed a weakness, which was the tendency to overlook deceptive marketing when practiced by firms that were members of the business establishment.

Keywords: regulation, business organizations

JEL Classification: N82, K2, L5

Accepted Paper Series





Not Available For Download

Date posted: May 24, 2009 ; Last revised: February 11, 2011

Suggested Citation

Balleisen, Edward, Private Cops on the Fraud Beat: The Limits of American Business Self-Regulation, 1895–1932 (May 19, 2009). Business History Review, Vol. 83, No. 1, 2009. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1407187

Contact Information

Edward Balleisen (Contact Author)
Duke University ( email )
100 Fuqua Drive
Durham, NC 27708-0204
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 792

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo4 in 0.265 seconds