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http://ssrn.com/abstract=1421705
 
 

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Do International Treaties Promote Development? The Convention on the Rights of the Child and Basic Immunization


Varun Gauri


World Bank; World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG)

June 1, 2009

World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 4964

Abstract:     
Little evidence is available on whether changing global rules so as to promote human rights can enhance development outcomes. The Convention on the Rights of the Child was almost universally ratified by the mid-1990s, but it is unclear whether treaty ratification was associated with better or wider protection of children's rights. This paper uses an instrumental variable approach to investigate whether treaty ratification was associated with stronger effort at the country level on child survival, and particularly with higher rates of immunization coverage. The paper finds that ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child was correlated with a subsequent increase in immunization rates, but only in upper middle and high-income countries. Treaties can promote development outcomes, but require institutional support to do so.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 28

Keywords: Population Policies, Labor Policies, Treaties, Human Rights, Children and Youth

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Date posted: June 18, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Gauri, Varun, Do International Treaties Promote Development? The Convention on the Rights of the Child and Basic Immunization (June 1, 2009). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper Series, Vol. , pp. -, 2009. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1421705

Contact Information

Varun Gauri (Contact Author)
World Bank ( email )
1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States
HOME PAGE: http://econ.worldbank.org/staff/vgauri
World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG)
1818 H. Street, N.W.
MSN3-311
Washington, DC 20433
United States
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