Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1424076
 
 

Citations (177)



 


 



Gambling with the House Money and Trying to Break Even: The Effects of Prior Outcomes on Risky Choice


Richard H. Thaler


University of Chicago - Booth School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Eric J. Johnson


Columbia Business School - Marketing

1990

Management Science, Vol. 36, No. 6, pp. 643-660, 1990

Abstract:     
How is risk-taking affected by prior gains and losses? While normative theory implores decision makers to only consider incremental outcomes, real decision makers are influenced by prior outcomes. We first consider how prior outcomes are combined with the potential payoffs offered by current choices. We propose an editing rule to describe how decision makers frame such problems. We also present data from real money experiments supporting a "house money effect" (increased risk seeking in the presence of a prior gain) and "break-even effects" (in the presence of prior losses, outcomes which offer a chance to break even are especially attractive).

Keywords: decision making, prospect theory, sunk costs, mental accounting


Open PDF in Browser Download This Paper

Date posted: June 29, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Thaler, Richard H. and Johnson, Eric J., Gambling with the House Money and Trying to Break Even: The Effects of Prior Outcomes on Risky Choice (1990). Management Science, Vol. 36, No. 6, pp. 643-660, 1990. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1424076

Contact Information

Richard H. Thaler (Contact Author)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )
5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States
773-702-5208 (Phone)
773-702-0458 (Fax)

Chicago Booth School of Business Logo

Eric J. Johnson
Columbia Business School - Marketing ( email )
New York, NY 10027
United States

Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 4,272
Downloads: 1,438
Download Rank: 8,396
Citations:  177

© 2016 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollobot1 in 2.297 seconds