Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1432621
 


 



What DNA 'Fingerprinting' Can Teach the Law About the Rest of Forensic Science


Jonathan J. Koehler


Northwestern University - School of Law

Michael J. Saks


Arizona State University (ASU) - Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

1991

Cardozo Law Review, Vol. 13, pp. 361-372, 1991

Abstract:     
The most important legacy of DNA 'fingerprinting' and the debate surrounding it will likely be a spillover of standards of empirical testing and statistical rigor to many other forensic sciences which, somehow, have exempted themselves from the conventional standards of scientific rigor. In short, the debate over DNA fingerprinting may compel the rest of forensic science to become more recognizably scientific. The purpose of this paper is to suggest the lessons to be learned by and about the rest of forensic science from the admirable model provided by the way the legal, academic, scientific, and forensic science communities have treated genetic fingerprinting.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 12

Keywords: Fingerprinting, DNA, forensic science

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Date posted: July 10, 2009 ; Last revised: May 17, 2014

Suggested Citation

Koehler, Jonathan J. and Saks, Michael J., What DNA 'Fingerprinting' Can Teach the Law About the Rest of Forensic Science (1991). Cardozo Law Review, Vol. 13, pp. 361-372, 1991. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1432621

Contact Information

Jonathan J. Koehler
Northwestern University - School of Law ( email )
375 E. Chicago Ave
Unit 1505
Chicago, IL 60611
United States
Michael J. Saks (Contact Author)
Arizona State University (ASU) - Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law ( email )
Box 877906
Tempe, AZ 85287-7906
United States
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