Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1445036
 
 

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The House that Taxpayers Built: Exploring the Rise in Publicly Funded Baseball Stadiums from 1953 Through the Present


Marc Edelman


Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, City University of New York; Fordham University School of Law

Spring 2009

Villanova Sports and Entertainment Law Journal, Vol. 16, 2009

Abstract:     
This Article explains how MLB club-owners use their control over the market for premier, professional baseball to demand free public stadiums. Part I of this Article explains how the United States has moved from having just one publicly funded MLB stadium (pre-1950s) to having over twenty-five publicly funded stadiums (present). Part II shows how, in recent years, MLB club-owners have continued to demand more money from their host cities and how host cities generally succumb to MLB club-owners’ demands.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 10

Keywords: stadium subsidies, publicly funded stadiums, sports law, sports economics, antitrust, sports, law, baseball, baseball stadiums, subsidy, monopoly

JEL Classification: A10, A12, A14, C70, D21, H20, H23, H41, H50, K11, K21, L12, L40, L41, L43, L51,L52, L83, R50, R51

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Date posted: August 8, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Edelman, Marc, The House that Taxpayers Built: Exploring the Rise in Publicly Funded Baseball Stadiums from 1953 Through the Present (Spring 2009). Villanova Sports and Entertainment Law Journal, Vol. 16, 2009. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1445036

Contact Information

Marc Edelman (Contact Author)
Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, City University of New York ( email )
One Bernard Baruch Way
Box B9-220
New York, NY 10010
United States
Fordham University School of Law ( email )
140 West 62nd Street
New York, NY 10023
United States
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