Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1447489
 


 



The Roots of Printz: Proslavery Constitutionalism, National Law Enforcement, Federalism, and Local Cooperation


Paul Finkelman


Albany Law School - Government Law Center

2004

Brooklyn Law Review, Vol. 69, 2004

Abstract:     
This article is about federal statutes that conscript state officials and how Congress should be required to carry out the laws. In Printz, the Solicitor General and Justice Scalia invoked the Fugitive Slave Law of 1793 to support a legal proposition, though the analyses were both unlikely and incorrect. This article offers a history of the Fugitive Slave Law and Prigg v. Pennsylvania to illustrate the problems with relying on state officials to implement and enforce federal policy, and the state personal liberty laws that undermined the federal laws’ effectiveness.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 21

Keywords: federal statutes, fugitive slave law

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: August 13, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Finkelman, Paul, The Roots of Printz: Proslavery Constitutionalism, National Law Enforcement, Federalism, and Local Cooperation (2004). Brooklyn Law Review, Vol. 69, 2004. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1447489

Contact Information

Paul Finkelman (Contact Author)
Albany Law School - Government Law Center ( email )
80 New Scotland Avenue
Albany, NY 12208
United States

Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 393
Downloads: 48

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo7 in 0.219 seconds