Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1469708
 


 



Therapy and the Problem of Autonomous Consent


Jeffrie G. Murphy


Arizona State University College of Law

1979

International Journal of Law & Psychiatry, Vol. 2, pp. 415-430, 1979

Abstract:     
A basic demand of justice is that we respect the rights and special status of autonomous persons. This means that we must not use such persons against their wills for the benefit of others. This article addresses this interrelationship between autonomy and justice, specifically in the sphere of inmates in so-called total institutions. It concludes that these inmates are not necessarily incapable of giving valid consent, even to very controversial therapies. It reaches this conclusion through an analysis of the concepts of informed consent, voluntary consent, and competent consent. These concepts are morally loaded, and we cannot think about them in purely psychological terms but must think of them in moral terms as well.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 16

Keywords: Psychosurgery, Autonomy, Criminal Justice

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: September 10, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Murphy, Jeffrie G., Therapy and the Problem of Autonomous Consent (1979). International Journal of Law & Psychiatry, Vol. 2, pp. 415-430, 1979. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1469708

Contact Information

Jeffrie G. Murphy (Contact Author)
Arizona State University College of Law ( email )
Box 877906
Tempe, AZ 85287-7906
United States
(480) 965-5856 (Phone)
(480) 965-2427 (Fax)
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 282
Downloads: 15
Paper comments
No comments have been made on this paper

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo3 in 0.344 seconds