Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1469714
 


 



Religious Conviction and Political Advocacy


Jeffrie G. Murphy


Arizona State University College of Law

2001

The Modern Schoolman, Vol. 78, No. 125, January/March 2001

Abstract:     
Citizens in liberal democracies advocate all sorts of things for all sorts of idiosyncratic and even silly reasons and yet it is thought by many liberals that the person offering those reasons does not violate some deep principles of good “citizenship” unless the reasons either invite the label “religious” or, as with racist reasons, tend to undermine the values of liberal democracy itself. But why single out religion in this way? If democratic politics thrives on the Millian idea of the marketplace of ideas, are we to assume that only religious ideas and perhaps antidemocratic ideas lack such market value? In this essay I will raise some (perhaps naïve) questions and try out some tentative and highly revisable suggestions.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 10

Keywords: Democracy, religion, politics

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Date posted: September 10, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Murphy, Jeffrie G., Religious Conviction and Political Advocacy (2001). The Modern Schoolman, Vol. 78, No. 125, January/March 2001. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1469714

Contact Information

Jeffrie G. Murphy (Contact Author)
Arizona State University College of Law ( email )
Box 877906
Tempe, AZ 85287-7906
United States
(480) 965-5856 (Phone)
(480) 965-2427 (Fax)
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