Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1473518
 
 

References (70)



 


 



Can You Talk Like a Lawyer and Still Think Like a Human Being?: Mertz’s the Language of Law School


John M. Conley


University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill - School of Law

September 14, 2009

Law & Social Inquiry, Vol. 34
UNC Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1473518

Abstract:     
The last thirty years in anthropology, as well as in linguistics and many of the other social sciences, has been characterized by a shift in theoretical focus from structure to practice. In The Language of Law School: Learning to "Think Like a Lawyer" (2007), the linguistic anthropologist and law professor Elizabeth Mertz has brought this practice perspective to bear on the extraordinary linguistic and cultural venue that is the first-year law school classroom. In revealing the linguistic realities of teaching new students to "think like a lawyer", she raises fascinating questions about the relationship between language and thought, the subtle effects of legal education, and the nature of law itself.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 68

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: September 16, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Conley, John M., Can You Talk Like a Lawyer and Still Think Like a Human Being?: Mertz’s the Language of Law School (September 14, 2009). Law & Social Inquiry, Vol. 34; UNC Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1473518. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1473518

Contact Information

John M. Conley (Contact Author)
University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill - School of Law ( email )
Van Hecke-Wettach Hall, 160 Ridge Road
CB #3380
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3380
United States
919-962-8502 (Phone)
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 2,768
Downloads: 370
Download Rank: 43,930
References:  70

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo2 in 0.250 seconds