Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1477145
 
 

Footnotes (108)



 


 



The Prosecute/Extradite Dilemma: Concurrent Criminal Jurisdiction and Global Governance


Adam B. Abelson


New York University School of Law

September 22, 2009

UC Davis Journal of International Law and Policy, Vol. 16, p. 101, 2010

Abstract:     
In an increasingly mobile and interconnected world, national criminal laws interact transnationally through choices between extradition and prosecution in individual cases. The prosecute/extradite dilemma is a critical site of global governance – a decentralized site of interaction between national criminal laws that shapes how national and international interests are articulated and mediated. While criminal laws reflect a state’s fundamental norms, effective global governance requires a normative assessment of when a state should – and more crucially, when it should not – seek to further those norms when multiple countries have a basis for applying their criminal laws to particular conduct. This paper offers a conceptual framework for such an assessment, with particular emphasis on extraterritorial application of U.S. criminal laws.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 38

Keywords: Jurisdiction, international criminal law, aut dedere aut judicare, global governance, extradition, extraterritorial

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: September 23, 2009 ; Last revised: April 23, 2010

Suggested Citation

Abelson, Adam B., The Prosecute/Extradite Dilemma: Concurrent Criminal Jurisdiction and Global Governance (September 22, 2009). UC Davis Journal of International Law and Policy, Vol. 16, p. 101, 2010. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1477145

Contact Information

Adam Abelson (Contact Author)
New York University School of Law ( email )
40 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012-1099
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 477
Downloads: 163
Download Rank: 105,211
Footnotes:  108

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo6 in 3.454 seconds