Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1492292
 


 



Kenyan Politics and the Politics of Summer Programs


J. Patrick Kelly


Widener University - School of Law

October 21, 2009

Proceedings of the 102nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of International Law, p.461, 2009

Abstract:     
This brief article for the Proceedings of the American Society of International Law’s annual symposium discusses the interrelationship of Legal education partnerships in Africa and domestic politics using Kenya as an example. The practicalities and cultural benefits of living and studying in a foreign country are inevitably intertwined with the political tensions and aspirations embedded in that society. This article first discusses the special rewards and practicalities of a summer program in Africa; and then attempts to provide a richer, more complex picture of the recent political struggle and ethnic conflict in Kenya after the December, 2007 Presidential election. It draws on several narratives including Neo-colonialism, demographic determinism, British divide and rule, and Democratic Legitimacy to help explain events.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 7

Keywords: legal education, Africa, Kenya, neo-colonialism, ethnic clashes, summer abroad programs

JEL Classification: K33

Accepted Paper Series





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Date posted: October 24, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Kelly, J. Patrick, Kenyan Politics and the Politics of Summer Programs (October 21, 2009). Proceedings of the 102nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of International Law, p.461, 2009. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1492292

Contact Information

J. Patrick Kelly (Contact Author)
Widener University - School of Law ( email )
4601 Concord Pike
P.O. Box 7286
Wilmington, DE 19803-0474
United States
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