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http://ssrn.com/abstract=1496977
 
 

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The State of the Onion: Peeling Back the Layers of America’s Ambivalence Toward Judicial Independence


Charles G. Geyh


Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington

2007

Indiana Law Journal, Vol. 82, 2007

Abstract:     
This essay addresses the question of whether the public really wants an independent judiciary. It is a question which implicates two discrete issues: What is an independent judiciary?; and does the public want one? The first issue seemingly invites a protracted disquisition on the meaning of judicial independence, but that would be unnecessarily digressive. For purposes here, it will suffice to isolate from the several facets of judicial independence that scholars have identified, those of central relevance to the public judicial independence debate. With those meanings in hand, I will then turn to the second part of the question and peel back the layers of the public’s views on judicial independence, like an onion, to reveal the nature and extent of the public’s ambivalence.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 17

Keywords: Judicial independence, judicial accountability, judges, rule of law, courts, institutional legitimacy

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Date posted: October 31, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Geyh, Charles G., The State of the Onion: Peeling Back the Layers of America’s Ambivalence Toward Judicial Independence (2007). Indiana Law Journal, Vol. 82, 2007. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1496977

Contact Information

Charles G. Geyh (Contact Author)
Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington ( email )
211 S. Indiana Avenue
Bloomington, IN 47405
United States
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