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http://ssrn.com/abstract=1501505
 
 

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Short-Run Effects of Parental Job Loss on Children's Academic Achievement


Ann Huff Stevens


University of California, Davis - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Jessamyn Schaller


University of California, Davis - Department of Economics

November 2009

NBER Working Paper No. w15480

Abstract:     
We study the relationship between parental job loss and children’s academic achievement using data on job loss and grade retention from the 1996, 2001, and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. We find that a parental job loss increases the probability of children’s grade retention by 0.8 percentage points, or around 15 percent. After conditioning on child fixed effects, there is no evidence of significantly increased grade retention prior to the job loss, suggesting a causal link between the parental employment shock and children’s academic difficulties. These effects are concentrated among children whose parents have a high school education or less.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 42

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Date posted: November 9, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Stevens, Ann Huff and Schaller, Jessamyn, Short-Run Effects of Parental Job Loss on Children's Academic Achievement (November 2009). NBER Working Paper No. w15480. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1501505

Contact Information

Ann Stevens (Contact Author)
University of California, Davis - Department of Economics ( email )
One Shields Drive
Davis, CA 95616-8578
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Jessamyn Schaller
University of California, Davis - Department of Economics ( email )
One Shields Drive
Davis, CA 95616-8578
United States
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