Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1510360
 
 

Citations (1)



 
 

Footnotes (37)



 


 



What Explains Persistent Racial Disproportionality in Minnesota’s Prison and Jail Populations?


Richard S. Frase


University of Minnesota Law School

November 20, 2009

Crime and Justice: A Review of Research, Vol. 38, pp. 201-280
Minnesota Legal Studies Research Paper No. 09-47

Abstract:     
Racial disparity in prison and jail populations, measured by the ratio of black to white per capita incarceration rates, varies substantially from state to state. To understand these variations, researchers must examine disparity at earlier stages of the criminal process and also racial differences in socioeconomic status that help explain disparity in cases entering the system. Researchers must adjust disparity ratios to correct for limitations in available data and in studies of prior incarceration rates. Minnesota has one of the highest black/white incarceration ratios. Disparities at the earliest measurable stages of Minnesota’s criminal process – arrest and felony conviction – are as great as the disparity in total custody (prison plus jail) populations. Disparities are substantially greater in prison sentences imposed and prison populations than at arrest and conviction. The primary reason is the heavy weight sentencing guidelines give to offenders’ prior conviction records. Highly disparate arrest rates appear to reflect unusually high rates of socioeconomic disparity between black and white residents.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 81

Keywords: sentencing, racial disparity, inequality, socioeconomic disparity

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: November 23, 2009  

Suggested Citation

Frase, Richard S., What Explains Persistent Racial Disproportionality in Minnesota’s Prison and Jail Populations? (November 20, 2009). Crime and Justice: A Review of Research, Vol. 38, pp. 201-280; Minnesota Legal Studies Research Paper No. 09-47. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1510360

Contact Information

Richard S. Frase (Contact Author)
University of Minnesota Law School ( email )
229 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States
612-625-0831 (Phone)
612-625-2011 (Fax)
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 1,066
Downloads: 192
Download Rank: 87,903
Citations:  1
Footnotes:  37

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo2 in 1.125 seconds