Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1510508
 
 

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Price Gouging and Market Failure


Matt Zwolinski


University of San Diego

November 21, 2009

New Essays on Philosophy, Politics & Economic: Integration and Common Research Projects, Gerald Gaus, Julian Lamont and Christi Favor, eds., Stanford University Press, May 2010

Abstract:     
Price gouging occurs when, in the wake of an emergency, sellers of a certain necessary goods sharply raise their prices beyond the level needed to cover increased costs. Most people think that price gouging is immoral, and most states have laws rendering the practice a civil or criminal offense. But the alleged wrongness of price gouging has been seriously under-theorized. This paper examines the argument that price gouging is morally objectionable and/or the proper subject of legal regulation because of the context of market failure in which it occurs. It argues that even if claims of market failure or true, they do not generate these normative conclusions.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 34

Keywords: price gouging, market failure, exploitation, price system, markets

JEL Classification: D41, D43, D45, D61, D63

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Date posted: November 21, 2009 ; Last revised: June 8, 2013

Suggested Citation

Zwolinski, Matt, Price Gouging and Market Failure (November 21, 2009). New Essays on Philosophy, Politics & Economic: Integration and Common Research Projects, Gerald Gaus, Julian Lamont and Christi Favor, eds., Stanford University Press, May 2010. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1510508

Contact Information

Matt Zwolinski (Contact Author)
University of San Diego ( email )
5998 Alcala Park
San Diego, CA 92110-2492
United States
619-260-4094 (Phone)
HOME PAGE: http://www.sandiego.edu/~mzwolinski
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