Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1554964
 
 

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Gradual and Sudden Shifts in Political Perceptions: Impressions of Negativity in the 2000 U.S. Presidential Campaign


Lee Sigelman


George Washington University - Department of Political Science

Erik Voeten


Georgetown University - Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service (SFS)

January 25, 2005


Abstract:     
How do citizens’ perceptions of a political campaign change over the course of the campaign? To find out, we probed the dynamics of the perceived difference in the negativity of the Bush and Gore campaigns in the 2000 U.S. presidential election. The analysis revealed a major turning point in these perceptions shortly after the first campaign debate; beyond that major one-time shift, the tone of what the candidates said during the campaign had no significant effect on the public’s impressions of the tone of the campaign. These results are interesting in and of themselves, and the analysis that produced them holds out considerable promise for future research on the dynamics of election campaigns.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 19

Keywords: Presidential elections, campaigns, negative advertising

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Date posted: February 20, 2010  

Suggested Citation

Sigelman, Lee and Voeten, Erik, Gradual and Sudden Shifts in Political Perceptions: Impressions of Negativity in the 2000 U.S. Presidential Campaign (January 25, 2005). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1554964 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1554964

Contact Information

Lee Sigelman
George Washington University - Department of Political Science ( email )
Washington, DC 20052
United States
Erik Voeten (Contact Author)
Georgetown University - Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service (SFS) ( email )
Washington, DC 20057
United States
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