Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1557943
 
 

Footnotes (17)



 


 



‘Occupancy’ and ‘Settlement’: Anishinaabemowin and the Interpretation of Michigan Indian Treaty Language


Matthew L. M. Fletcher


Michigan State University College of Law

February 23, 2010

MSU Legal Studies Research Paper No. 08-04

Abstract:     
The 2007 Consent Decree in United States v. Michigan, a major victory for the tribal interests, recognized that the lands in ownership by the state, federal, and tribal governments – vast swaths of Michigan – would stand in for the lands not yet “required for settlement.” The Michigan Indians’ “privilege” to continued “occupancy” acquired legal determinacy. This short essay examines how Michigan Indian treaty negotiators would have understood the meaning of the words “settlement” and “occupancy,” and how that understanding strongly influenced the land base in which Michigan Indians can continue to exercise their inland treaty rights in accordance with the 1836 Treaty.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 13

Keywords: Anishinaabemowin, American Indian treaty rights, 1836 Treaty of Washington, Michigan Indian, Grand Traverse Band, Little Traverse Bay Bands, Odawa

working papers series





Download This Paper

Date posted: February 25, 2010  

Suggested Citation

Fletcher, Matthew L. M., ‘Occupancy’ and ‘Settlement’: Anishinaabemowin and the Interpretation of Michigan Indian Treaty Language (February 23, 2010). MSU Legal Studies Research Paper No. 08-04. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1557943 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1557943

Contact Information

Matthew L. M. Fletcher (Contact Author)
Michigan State University College of Law ( email )
318 Law College Building
East Lansing, MI 48824-1300
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 664
Downloads: 130
Download Rank: 132,685
Footnotes:  17

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo7 in 0.265 seconds