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Indigenizing Intellectual Property Law: Customary Law, Legal Pluralism, and the Protection of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, Identity, and Resources


Danielle M. Conway


University of Hawaii at Manoa - William S. Richardson School of Law; University of Hawaii at Manoa - Institute of Asian-Pacific Business Law

2009

Texas Weleyan Law Review, Vol. 15, No. 2, 2009

Abstract:     
Cultures live and cultures die. Cultures live by the transmission of law, knowledge, land, and resources from one generation to the next. Cultures die, in large measure, because of exploitation of peoples and the knowledge they possess. In reality, cultures are constantly under attack from politically-oriented societies bent on exterminating, exploiting, or commercializing any culture that is different. Commercialization or commodification of culture is akin to collecting culture for purposes of exploitation, observation, voyeurism, and objectification. The western approach to globalization is keen to recognize culture as an object rather than as a living, evolving organ to be shielded from exploitation. To respond to western commodification of culture, this article proposes that legal pluralism is necessary, in the interim, to protect culture from those who would, without authority or justification, exploit it and reduce it to a short term and short-lived commodity. The proposal to indigenize intellectual property law is for sure only an interim measure to protect Indigenous resources up to and until Indigenous Peoples has fully realized self-determination. In addition, the interim nature of this proposal reflects the legacy of colonization, with its complex extra- and intra-Indigenous power-oppression relationships. Because Indigenous Peoples are rarely in a position to exercise rights from a position of power, there is always risk in proposing legal rules or models for protection that may not fully account for the complex legacy of colonization. With this in mind, this article proposes that legal pluralism is one workable interim means to indigenize western intellectual property law in order to provide essential protections against the ongoing obliteration of Indigenous Peoples’ rights, identity, and resources.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 50

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Date posted: March 3, 2010  

Suggested Citation

Conway, Danielle M., Indigenizing Intellectual Property Law: Customary Law, Legal Pluralism, and the Protection of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, Identity, and Resources (2009). Texas Weleyan Law Review, Vol. 15, No. 2, 2009. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1559370

Contact Information

Danielle M. Conway (Contact Author)
University of Hawaii at Manoa - William S. Richardson School of Law ( email )
2515 Dole Street
Honolulu, HI 96822
United States
HOME PAGE: http://www.law.hawaii.edu/personnel/conway-jones/danielle
University of Hawaii at Manoa - Institute of Asian-Pacific Business Law ( email )
University of Hawaii at Manoa
2515 Dole Street
Honolulu, HI 96822-2328
United States
HOME PAGE: http://www.law.hawaii.edu/personnel/conway-jones/danielle
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