Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1563612
 
 

Citations (3)



 


 



Brain Imaging for Legal Thinkers: A Guide for the Perplexed


Owen D. Jones


Vanderbilt University - Law School & Dept. of Biological Sciences

Joshua Buckholtz


Vanderbilt University, Neuroscience Program

Jeffrey D. Schall


Vanderbilt University - Department of Psychology

Rene Marois


Vanderbilt University - Department of Psychology
Center for Integrative and Cognitive Neuroscience

December 20, 2009

Stanford Technology Law Review, Vol. 5, 2009
Vanderbilt Public Law Research Paper No. 10-09

Abstract:     
It has become increasingly common for brain images to be proffered as evidence in criminal and civil litigation. This Article - the collaborative product of scholars in law and neuroscience - provides three things.

First, it provides the first introduction, specifically for legal thinkers, to brain imaging. It describes in accessible ways the new techniques and methods that the legal system increasingly encounters.

Second, it provides a tutorial on how to read and understand a brain-imaging study. It does this by providing an annotated walk-through of the recently-published work (by three of the authors - Buckholtz, Jones, and Marois) that discovered the brain activity underlying a person's decisions: a) whether to punish someone; and b) how much to punish. The annotation uses the 'Comment' feature of the Word software to supply contextual and step-by-step commentary on what unfamiliar terms mean, how and why brain imaging experiments are designed as they are, and how to interpret the results.

Third, the Article offers some general guidelines about how to avoid misunderstanding brain images in legal contexts and how to identify when others are misusing brain images.

The Article is a product of the 'Law and Neuroscience Project', supported by the MacArthur Foundation.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 49

Keywords: brain, brain imaging, brain scan, neuroscience, law & neuroscience, litigation, evidence, functional magnetic resonance imaging, Daubert, behavioral biology, fMRI, MRI, EEG, MEG, PET

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: March 4, 2010  

Suggested Citation

Jones, Owen D. and Buckholtz, Joshua and Schall, Jeffrey D. and Marois, Rene, Brain Imaging for Legal Thinkers: A Guide for the Perplexed (December 20, 2009). Stanford Technology Law Review, Vol. 5, 2009; Vanderbilt Public Law Research Paper No. 10-09. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1563612

Contact Information

Owen D. Jones (Contact Author)
Vanderbilt University - Law School & Dept. of Biological Sciences ( email )
131 21st Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37203-1181
United States
Joshua Buckholtz
Vanderbilt University, Neuroscience Program ( email )
Nashville, TN 37232-0685
United States
Jeffrey D. Schall
Vanderbilt University - Department of Psychology ( email )
Nashville, TN 37240
United States
Rene Marois
Vanderbilt University - Department of Psychology
Center for Integrative and Cognitive Neuroscience
( email )
Nashville, TN 37240
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 7,621
Downloads: 1,818
Download Rank: 3,865
Citations:  3
Paper comments
No comments have been made on this paper

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo7 in 0.360 seconds