Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1602150
 


 



Crimes Against Humanity


Margaret M. DeGuzman


Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law

May 7, 2010

HANDBOOK OF INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW, Schabas et al., eds., Routledge, 2010
Temple University Legal Studies Research Paper, No. 2010-9

Abstract:     
The concept of crimes against humanity emerged in reaction to massive government-orchestrated crimes including, in particular, the holocaust. Unlike the other prototypically international crimes – war crimes and genocide – the proscription against crimes against humanity has not been enshrined in an international convention. Instead, the law of crimes against humanity has developed piecemeal, largely through the legal instruments and jurisprudence of the various courts and tribunals adjudicating these crimes. This chapter describes the evolution of the definition of crimes against humanity and argues that the ad hoc development of these crimes has produced enduring normative debates and doctrinal ambiguities.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 34

Keywords: international law, international justice, international criminal law

JEL Classification: K14, K33

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Date posted: May 10, 2010 ; Last revised: July 12, 2011

Suggested Citation

deGuzman, Margaret M., Crimes Against Humanity (May 7, 2010). HANDBOOK OF INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW, Schabas et al., eds., Routledge, 2010; Temple University Legal Studies Research Paper, No. 2010-9. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1602150

Contact Information

Margaret M. DeGuzman (Contact Author)
Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law ( email )
1719 N. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States
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