Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1608117
 


 



A Virtual World Experiment on Emergent Behavior in Collective Action Problems


Kevin A. McCabe


George Mason University - Department of Economics; George Mason University School of Law

Peter B. Twieg


George Mason University

Jaap Weel


George Mason University - Department of Economics

May 14, 2010

Gruter Institute Squaw Valley Conference 2010: Law, Institutions & Human Behavior

Abstract:     
Social scientists are interested in how organizations manage group decisions to more efficiently solve collective action problems. In studying this question scientists have relied on a combination of empirical field work, game theoretic modeling, and experiments. What has emerged is a successful common practice for institutional design which can be characterized as follows: One, use field studies, to characterize the incentives and informational problems that exist, and to hypothesize how institutional rules work to efficiently organize collective action. Two, use non-cooperative game theory to formalize these hypotheses, and then study the comparative equilibrium properties of different institutional rules in theory and in the laboratory. Three, run randomized experiments in the field to study how policy changes can improve collective action outcomes. In this paper we investigate the potential for virtual worlds in taking intermediate steps between one and two, and between two and three. A key element of empirical field research (in one and three) is natural context and natural language. These two elements help to situate and discuss the problem and yet they are usually absent in the translation to theory and in laboratory experiments.

In our experiments in Second Life™ we study a collective action problem of protecting capital from natural disasters. These experiments are motivated in large part by Elinor Ostrom’s analysis of self organized and self-governed solutions to common pool resource problems. To do this the participants must (1) supply the rules of the game, (2) commit to following the rules, (3) and monitor that the rules are indeed followed. Ostrom demonstrates that in the field enduring solutions to common pool resource problems satisfy design principles which can be implemented in our experiments. Besides the obvious questions of how successful are subjects at solving their collective action problem, we are also interested in the properties of these emergent solutions. We hypothesize that game theory will be useful in elucidating the issues that will emerge in finding congruent solutions between the local conditions (modifiable by experimental design) and the appropriate governance rules. We also hypothesize that Construal Level Theory, Liberman and Trope, can be used to analyze the psychological distance from objects and events and subjects mental construal. Psychological distance can be measured in the natural language message space of subjects and will have an impact on the solution to the collective action problem.

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Date posted: May 16, 2010  

Suggested Citation

McCabe, Kevin A. and Twieg, Peter B. and Weel, Jaap, A Virtual World Experiment on Emergent Behavior in Collective Action Problems (May 14, 2010). Gruter Institute Squaw Valley Conference 2010: Law, Institutions & Human Behavior. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1608117

Contact Information

Kevin A. McCabe (Contact Author)
George Mason University - Department of Economics ( email )
4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
United States
George Mason University School of Law ( email )
3301 Fairfax Drive
Arlington, VA 22201
United States
Peter B. Twieg
George Mason University ( email )
4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
United States
Jaap Weel
George Mason University - Department of Economics ( email )
4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
United States
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